Adesiji Rabiu

My protégé, Nadeem, was very easy to work with. He was calm, and took both direct and indirect feedback well. At the time we were paired, Nadeem had been in Canada for 4 months, and I felt that he was discouraged and uninspired. One of the first things I told Nadeem was: “we can find a job together; however, you are in charge of the relationship—you will set up meetings and do the follow up.”

I told him that I heard that it takes immigrants about 2 – 4 months to secure a job in their field; and if he has not found one by now, he might be doing something wrong: perhaps, you likely have a badly written or formatted resume; or you might be applying for jobs that require more experience than you have; or you might need to identify alternative jobs based on your skills set.

After our first meeting of getting to know each other, I noticed Nadeem’s energy level had gone up—he was more open with me and we talked a little bit about each other on a more personal level. I asked Nadeem how many positions he applied to in the past week, and he said about 8/9. I informed Nadeem that in my first 10 days of landing in Canada, I applied to over 100 jobs. I also informed him that I landed my first job in about 3 weeks, and it was not at McDonalds. In fact, I worked the job for 5.5 years.

Subsequently, we worked on his resume, and after a few good interviews, he resumed as a Solutions Architect at TELUS. I’m extremely pleased with his achievement, and very happy for his family.

I asked my protégés to Take the Lead—articulate your strengths, skills and preferred outcomes/goals; and to Learn—be aware of the forces that may impact realizing your defined outcomes/goals. Realizing your defined and desired outcomes will involve making wise choices amongst alternatives. I also gave him a copy of my book “Leading and Realizing Your Career Goals.”